MXA’S WEEKEND NEWS ROUND-UP: THIS YEAR IS COMING TO AN END, LET’S CRAM ALL THE RIDING WE CAN INTO IT

HAVE YOU SEEN THE JANUARY 2022 ISSUE OF MXA? IT IS THE BEST DEAL IN THE SPORT!

If you don’t subscribe to MXA, you are missing a whole different world of motocross news, facts, test and photographs. For example, the just released January 2022 issue includes a complete and thorough test of Jo Shimoda’s Pro Circuit Kawasaki KX250 and Dilan Schwartz’s Bar-X Suzuki RM-Z250. Not only did Jo become the leading rider on the Pro Circuit team (after being picked up in a try-out after the Geico Honda team folded and left Jo without a ride), better yet Dilan did what they said couldn’t be done when he put his often-berated RM-Z250 into the top ten at the 2021 AMA 250 National Championships. If that’s not enough, we give the 2022 Husqvarna FC450 the full test treatment and tell you all the things we found to make it better. Plus, we run the 2022 Yamaha YZ450F and Honda CRF450 through their paces. When you’re done reading the bike tests, take the time to sit down and read Jim Kimball’s interview with Billy “Sugar Bear” Grossi and Josh Mosiman’s interview with EKS Brand’s Rich Taylor. You will be surprised by their takes on living the motocross lifestyle. Plus, much, much, much more.

YOU CAN’T AFFORD NOT TO SUBSCRIBE TO MXA! IT’S FULL OF THINGS YOU CAN’T LEARN ANYWHERE ELSE,  YOU PLUS GET A $25 ROCKY MOUNTAIN GIFT CREDIT TO COVER YOUR COSTS

You can’t afford not to subscribe, because when you get order a $19.99 subscription, Rocky Mountain ATV/MC sends you a $25 gift credit to use on anything you want from their massive selection. Plus, subscribers to MXA can get the digital mag on their iPhone, iPad, Kindle or Android by going to the Apple Store, Amazon or Google Play or in a digital version. Even better, you can subscribe to Motocross Action and get the awesome print edition delivered to your house by a uniformed employee of the U.S. Government. Do we have to mention the $25 Rocky Mountain ATV/MC gift card again? You can’t lose on this deal? Call (800) 767-0345 or Click Here

• “THIS WEEK IN MXA” WITH JOSH MOSIMAN: EKS BRAND IS THE HOTTEST GOGGLE COMPANY GOING, MEET THE MAN WHO MADE IT HAPPEN

• REM MOTOCROSS IS BACK AT GLEN HELEN THIS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4

To find out how to join the REMolution go to www.remsatmx.com or Click Here

• MXA VIDEO: 2022 YAMAHA YZ250 TWO-STROKE VIDEO TEST

MXA PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: BLENDZALL #640 SYNZALL FULL- SYNTHETIC RACING 4T MOTOR OIL

“Blendzall has been the leader in castor-based oil for over 60 years, so when we developed our new line of synthetic 4T engine oils, we tested extensively to ensure the oils meet our brand’s high-performance standards. Blendzall’s premium full-synthetic Synzall 10W40 uses the finest-quality fluids combined with an elite synthetic polymer designed for extreme pressure. It boasts anti-wear properties and offers shear-resistant protection. Synzall 4T-R also meets the OEM standards for API SN and JASO MA/MA2.” —Blendzall’s David Schloss. The retail price is $16.95 at www.blendzall.com or your local dealer.

ROMAIN FEBVRE HAS TIB/FIB SURGERY: ON THE ROAD TO RECOVERY

Romain Febvre

Romain Febvre had successful surgery on Sunday, November 28 to fix the broken tibia and fibula in the right leg. Febvre crashed in moto two at the Paris Supercross while running second behind Marvin Musquin. The runner-up in the 2021 FIM 450 World Championship mis-timed a rythym section and got bucked off the seat of his KX450 into the face of the next big jump. That catapaulted him into a feet-off Superman-style crash. The 2022 FIM 450 World Championship starts on February 20, 2022 at Matterley Basin in England. It is a tight time line for Febvre’s injury, but doable. Febvre posted this message to his fans: “Not the way I wanted to finish the season for sure! I was happy with my riding, didn’t take any risks, and I felt more and more comfortable with the track when I had this crash. In my career I have already recovered from injuries, I know what that means and for sure I will be back stronger.

INSIDE SECRETS OF THE 1999 HONDA CR250: WHAT YOU NEEDED TO KNOW 23 YEARS AGO

1999 Honda CR250This test of the 1999 Honda CR250 was featured in the August 1999 issue of MXA.

This is everything you need to know about the 1999 Honda CR250. Below are 42 tips, fixes and ailments that you don’t want to live without when riding the first generation aluminum frame CR250.

     1. Has your clutch lever come loose yet? Switch the stock pivot bolt nut to a locking nut replacement and blue Loctite it in place. The rear fender bolts also come loose. Do not use thread lock on the rear bolts because this can spin the nut embedded flush inside the plastic fender.
     2. Check the spokes often. They get loose more than in the past because the suspension is better and the bike is being pushed harder through the bumps.
     3. The chain adjuster and ignition cover bolts should also be checked before each ride.
     4. When the tires are off, remove the rim strip and lubricate the spoke nipples with a wet anti-seize compound. Since the spokes require frequent tightening, it makes the nipples easier to turn. Clean the excess lube and run a strip of duct tape around the wheels a few times.
     5. The bracket that holds the seat at the front of the tank comes loose. Check the bolts often. Do not Loctite the bolts since it will cause the nut that’s embedded in the tank plastic to spin loose.
     6. Since the radiator shroud bolts are in a high maintenance area, grease those bolts to help keep the tank nuts locked in place.
     7. Secure the sprocket bolts with red Loctite.

Mickael Pichon 1999 CR250Mickael Pichon on a factory 1999 Honda CR250. Many of these tips were applied to the factory Honda’s back then.

     8. If you want to be factory, you will safety wire the throttle cable boots, front sprocket bolt, footpeg pins, steering stem nut, grips and brake house joints.
     9. If you don’t put the front wheel in the fork properly it will bind fork movement. Do not tighten the axle by turning the right side nut. Keep the axle nut fully seated and secured by the right fork leg axle pinch bolts. Turn the axle from the left to tighten. Leave the left side axle pinch bolts loose and lightly insert a small screwdriver between the axle split to relieve its clamp on the axle. Pump the forks a few times and, while keeping a load on the fork, remove the screwdriver and tighten the pinch bolts. Re-lube the pivots on a 1-1/2- to 6-month service schedule.

1999 Honda CR250

     10. The suspension hot-rod shops advise servicing the fork and shock after the first five hours of riding.
     11. To find a degree of fork plushness, first remove the springs and measure their overall length. Some springs have been coming up on the short end of the scale, so use spacers to bring the overall measurement to 495mm. Only use steel preload spacers available from a suspension shop.
     12. Fill each leg with 378cc’s of Showa SS7. Avoid Honda’s HP oil, which measures as a 7-weight. (Showa SS7 is a lighter 5-weight oil.) Too Tech Suspension runs an ultra-light 3-weight shock oil.
     13. An easy way to change oil height without using oil is to make fork oil displacers. Cut six, 25mm-long sections of one-inch diameter, schedule-40 PVC pipe. Cut a lengthwise split in every section. On each fork leg position three PVC pieces on the cartridge rod over the spring seat. When you displace the fork fluid, the oil level is raised and the air space reduced. Each spacer reduces the air space by 5cc, which makes the action more progressive at the end of the stroke. This allows the damping adjusters to be run more open for smoother action and the bike to hold its head up better.

1999 Honda CR250 engine

     14. For the best overall feel, lower the front by raising the fork legs 2mm to 3mm up in the clamps. Adjust the forks 12-clicks out on compression and 13 out on rebound. After riding, remove the PVC fluid displacers as necessary to achieve smooth bottoming performance. Most racers run two spacers per leg, while heavier, sumo riders run three.
     15. Honda uses chain torque to help the suspension resist bottoming. The way it works is that when the rear suspension collapses, the chain touches the top chain roller. Under power, the top length of chain is taut and it pushes against the top roller, thus helping to fight bottoming. Unfortunately, we think that Honda runs the wrong chain geometry on the CR250. MXA fixes it by running a smaller CR80 chain roller at the top. Now take the original top roller and switch it with the larger-diameter bottom roller. With the chain geometry back in line, it’s crucial to run exactly 25mm to 35mm of chain slack, measured just behind the back of the swingarm’s top chain slider.

Kevin Windham 1999 CR250Back in 1999 Kevin Windham rode for factory Honda aboard a CR250.

     16. Changing the gearing can throw the chain geometry completely out of whack. Honda technicians claim that you can improve the chain line and suspension action by using the CR500’s 14-tooth countershaft sprocket and CR125‘s 51-tooth rear sprocket (13/50 stock).
     17. With progressive fork action and smoother shock action, it is possible to run more shock preload. Adjust a 98mm ride height, five to six clicks out on compression, three-turns out on high-speed compression and 12 to 13 clicks out on rebound. Cumulatively, these mods make the rear suspension less sensitive to power forces and softer through hard, square-edged acceleration bumps. The balance will also be much more consistent in turns.
     18. Watch the swingarm and chain guide pads. If the chain guide pad wears too far, the chain saws through the guide. Worn swingarm pads will alter chain adjustment and the chain torque’s suspension effect.
     19. Your bike comes stock with a chintzy chain. Honda recommends the $100 DID gold chain. It lasts four times longer and seldom requires adjustment.

1999 Honda CR250We liked the stock gearing on the 1999 CR250. 

     20. Apply anti-seize to the chain adjuster bolts. When the bolts lose their factory coating, the threads seize and will effectively ruin the swingarm. Throw out the stock nuts and use self-locking replacements. Team FMF says to keep an eye on the swingarm bolts. They bend.
     21. For jetting MXA recommends a 172 main, 55 pilot, 1370L needle in the 4th clip and air screw two-turns out. If you need richer response through the midrange, switch to the 1369 needle in the fifth clip. Pro Circuit runs a leaner 168 main, 55 pilot, 1370 needle in the leaner 3rd clip, air screw at 1-1/2 turns out and race gas.
     22. Team FMF suggests that the air boot to airbox mount be removed and thoroughly sealed with silicone.
     23. Tape the carb vent hoses together and route out near the shock linkage.
     24. The kill switch wire pulls taut when turning the bars to the left and can get smashed between the stops turning to the right. Planet Honda protects its kill switch wire with a spiral wrap and reroutes it through the frame behind the steerer tube.

1999 Honda CR250 action

25.
The actuating cam on the clutch release lever can be chamfered for easier clutch feel. Planet Honda also polishes the clutch rod for smoother pull. Where the clutch cable makes its sharp 90 degree turn, use a zip-tie and secure it to the front number plate. This reduces cable flex and improves clutch feel. Finally, use a light machine oil to lubricate the cable.
     26. Check the throttle cable when running a bar that is taller or wider. Turn the bars from lock to lock and see if the cable is pulled taught or if it bunches up. Carefully reroute as required.
     27. An aluminum throttle tube rotates easier on the bar and provides smoother throttle action.
     28. Even though the ’99 CR250 handlebar is rubber-mounted, the vault-like aluminum chassis transfers excessive vibration to the grips. Use an aluminum bar and run a bar snake damper. Frequently check the perch torque.
     29. Here is a super secret frame trick. Remove the triple clamp and fill each frame spar by shooting spray insulation foam through the relief hole inside the steerer tube. When the foam dries, cut off the excess and reinstall the clamps. This will reduce vibration.
     30. Run clear adhesive on the plated footpeg area of the frame, airbox and side plates. This keeps boot-wear induced aluminum oxide from ruining the look of the bike.

1999 Honda CR250

31.
Trim the radiator shrouds where they rub against the frame.
     32. Check the piston ring end gap when servicing the top end. The optimum measurement is .015 inches and a tight ring can be filed to the proper gap if necessary. Use a fine file to lightly chamfer the edge of a new piston skirt.
     33. The power valve linkage is often misaligned when the cylinder is reinstalled. Visually check that the pin in the case lines up with the fork in the cylinder. The valve is under spring preload and it is often necessary to counter the tension to line the fork over the pin.
     34. Frequently remove the right side power valve cover and check the condition of the valves and linkage. Rotate the valves by hand and feel to see if they are sticky. Although contact cleaner dispels oil residue, it cannot not remove built-up varnish.
     35. Frequently check the reeds for cracks and chips. Most race teams use the stock petals, but they wear out quickly. If you are looking for more durability, Team FMF suggests running an aftermarket carbon replacement and Planet Honda says they’ve had success with Boyesen fiberglass replacements.
     36. There is a nook up inside the front of the rear brake caliper hydraulics that likes to trap air. Unbolt the caliper and hold it upright in the air when bleeding the brakes. Pry the pads apart and remount the caliper. Bleed the front and rear brakes often if you are a crasher. (It’s possible for air to mix throughout the hydraulics as the bike cartwheels down the track.)

Sebastien Tortelli 1999 CR250Sebastien Tortelli on a factory 1999 Honda CR250. 

     37. Planet Honda replaces the stock triple-clamp mounted front brake hose guide with a number plate-mounted guide from IMS. They claim much improved hose movement.
     38. Honda’s aluminum clutch drive plates quickly contaminate the gearbox oil (requiring the oil to be changed after each ride). Honda recommends their own GN4 10/40 oil, but any quality 10/40 motor oil will do.
     39. Team FMF says that the stock tire tubes are thin and should be switched out with regular Dunlop replacement tubes. The stock tubes don’t hold air very well, so check tire pressure before each ride.
     40. Cut 20mm lengths of hi-temp hose with an ID that snuggly fits over the exhaust springs. Use contact cleaner to slip the hose on the spring. This cuts down on vibration. Loctite and keep an eye on the pipe bolts. Since this is a high-maintenance area, don’t use anything stronger than blue thread lock.
     41. Run four exhaust spacers between the pipe and manifold (#18309-K23-600). The increased head pipe length makes delivery noticeably torquier off the bottom.
     42. Change to a metal ACG cover (that’s is Honda tech speak for an aluminum ignition cover.) Although the metal cover seals better than the stock plastic unit, still take it off after each wash, spray the innards with WD40 and keep the cover off until the next ride.

9TH ANNUAL KURT CASELLI RIDE DAY ON DEC. 4 AT PALA RACEWAY


For more info go to www.kurtcaselli.com.

MXA VIDEO: WE TEST THE ALL-NEW 2022 YAMAHA YZ125 TWO-STROKE

• KYLE YARNELL MEMORIAL TEAM RACE ON DECEMBER 5

For more info go to www.glenhelen.com

MXA PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: MYPITBOARD HANDLEBAR PAD GPS TIMER

The MyPitboard replaces your standard handlebar pad with a new pad and a touchscreen GPS computer that has lap-time mode, section mode, segment mode and holeshot mode to help you monitor your progress. The lap-time mode displays your recent lap time, total elapsed time, and the split difference between your current and last lap all on the screen so you can keep yourself accountable while riding and monitor your times after practice without needing any help. Retail price: $299.99 at www.mypitboard.com or (613) 858-5016.

MXA VIDEO: WE TEST THE 2022 GASGAS MC 450F

FIRE/POLICE CHRISTMAS GRAND PRIX AT ELSINORE ON TUESDAY, DEC. 7

To find out more go to www.firepolicemx.com.

• LAST OLD SCHOOL SCRAMBLES OF 2021 ON DECEMBER 11-12

To find out more go to www.ossrg.org

MXA VIDEO: WE TEST THE 2022 KTM 350SXF

TEAM TESTED: TWIN AIR RADIATOR SLEEVES

Twin Air radiator sleeves-2

Back in the golden oldie days, when two-strokes roamed the earth at will, savvy two-stroke riders would attach a section of wire mesh across the downtubes of their bikes to knock down mud before it could clog the fins of their air-cooled engines. The mud would stick to the wire mesh and then vibrate off. Twin Air obviously has some old moto soldiers in its design department, because that is exactly what Twin Air radiator sleeves do—except for radiators instead of cylinder fins.

The radiator sleeves did not disappoint. They held up well under all the conditions we threw at them. Not only did they help keep debris and mud out of the radiators, they also made for easy cleanup at the races. There was no need to pick at the radiator louvers or scrape for mud, which could potentially damage the radiator fins. After long test days in the hot sun, we did not lose any coolant due to the bike overheating with them installed. We rode with the sleeves on our test bikes for four months. At the end of the test, the radiator fins were in great shape. They didn’t have any of the normal dents and bent-over fins.

The Twin Air radiator sleeves are easy to mount. On a KTM 450SXF, the drill is simple: First, remove the four bolts from the radiator louvers and slide the Twin Air sleeves over the louvers. Second, align the pre-punched holes in the sleeves with the stock bolt holes before reinstalling the louvers. Third, when mounting the louvers back on your bike, hand-tighten all the bolts a few threads so that the soft material of the Twin Air sleeves does not bunch up around the bolts when they are tightened. Once all the bolts and sleeves are in place, tighten the louver bolts.

We had no issues with the spun-glass yarn material that Twin Air uses. Did you think they would use chicken wire like back in 1974? The Twin Air radiator sleeves are made from a nylon-coated, glass yarn designed to shed mud and dirt before it builds up. You could jerry-rig pantyhose or wire mesh to save money, but it won’t work as well as the Twin Air product—or last as long. We put them on and forgot them for four months. Then replaced them because what rocks and roost does to your radiator, it can do to spun-glass yarn (only a lot cheaper to replace). Since the radiators are hidden behind the side shrouds, the Twin Air radiator sleeves didn’t hurt the cosmetic appeal of the bike.

Twin Air radiator sleeves have been tested on the almost-always-muddy European Grand Prix circuit since 2014. As for the MXA wrecking crew, our SoCal home base isn’t known for its rainfall; however, we spend several days a week testing at seriously over-watered tracks and occasionally find actual mud during our rainy season. During our test period with the Twin Air radiator sleeves, we went looking for mud wherever we could find it and made lots of riders around us angry with our penchant for hitting every mud hole on the track.

DIGITS?$44.95—www.twinair.com or (800) 749-2890.

MXA RATING: If your racing environment is rainy, muddy or over-watered, you will find the Twin Air radiator sleeves invaluable. Radiators only work if air flows through them. Twin Air can make that happen in the worst of conditions.

MXA VIDEO: WE TEST THE 2022 KTM 450SXF

•  2022 AMA SUPERCROSS TV SCHEDULE: TIMES, CHANNELS & DAYS

All times Eastern (subtract three hours for Pacific Time Zone).

MXA VIDEO: 2022 YAMAHA YZ250F VIDEO TEST

2022 FIM 250/450 WORLD MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE

Take this MXGP schedule with a grain of salt—it will change, probably next week. The 2022 MXGP calendar features 20 Grands Prix along with the Monster Energy FIM Motocross des Nations which will be held at Red Bud on September 25, 2022.

2022 FIM GRAND PRIX CHAMPIONSHIP (TENTATIVE)
Feb. 20…Matterley Basin, England
Mar. 6…TBA, Argentina
Mar. 20…TBA
Mar. 27…Oss, Holland
April 10…Trentino, Italy
Apr. 24…Kegums, Latvia
May 1…Orlyonok, Russia
May 15…Rio Sardo, Sardinia.
May 29…Intu Xanadu, Spain
June 5…Ernee, France
June 12…Teutschenthal, Germany
June 26…Jakarta, Indonesia
July 3…Semarang, Indonesia
July 17…Locket, Czech Republic
July 24…Lommel, Belgium
Aug. 7…Uddevalla, Sweden
Aug. 14…KymiRing, Finland
Aug 21…St. Jean d’ Angely, France
Sept. 4…Afyonkarahisar, Turkey
Sept.18…TBA

MXA PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: ODI GRIPS SX8 HANDLEBAR PAD

“The newly released ODI SX8 handlebar pad is designed to be slightly oversized to provide increased impact padding and an improved look. The octagon-shaped end caps provide a distinct ODI factory look while being adhered to an ultra-lightweight EVA padding to deliver a solid feel with greater impact resistance. It is slightly oversized for improved visibility and increased impact padding and the Octagon -sided End-Caps provide a distinct ODI factory look. Now available in three sizes to fit most common 7/8th-inch handlebars: 245mm (9.75 inches) for full-sized bikes, 190mm (7.5 inches) for mid-sized bikes, and 160mm (6.25 inches) for minis.” —ODI Grips’ Johnny Jump. Retail price $21.95—www.odigrips.com or (951) 786-4755.

MXA VIDEO: 2022 KTM 250SXF VIDEO TEST

2022 AMA 250/450 NATIONAL MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE

2022 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
May 28…Pala, CA
June 4…Hangtown, CA
Jun 11…Thunder Valley, CO
June 18…Mt. Morris, PA
July 3…Red Bud, MI
July 9…Southwick, MA
July 16….Millville, MN
July 23….Washougal, WA
Aug. 13…Unadilla, NY
Aug. 20…Budds Creek, MD
Aug. 27…Crawfordsville, IN
Sept. 3…Pala, CA

MXA VIDEO: 2022 HONDA CRF450 VIDEO TEST

• 2022 AMA MONSTER ENERGY SUPERCROSS SCHEDULE

2022 AMA SUPERCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Jan. 8…Anaheim, CA
Jan. 15…Oakland, CA
Jan. 22…San Diego, CA
Jan. 29…Anaheim, CA
Feb. 5…Glendale, AZ
Feb. 12…Anaheim, CA
Feb. 19… Minneapolis, MN
Feb. 26… Arlington, TX
Mar. 5…Daytona Beach, FL
Mar. 12…Detroit, MI
Mar. 19…Indianapolis, IN
Mar. 26…Seattle, WA
Apr. 9…St. Louis, MO
Apr. 16…Atlanta, GA
Apr. 23…Foxborough, MA
Apr. 30…Denver, CO
May 7…Salt Lake City, UT

FOR TWO-STROKE PURISTS! ALL THE 2022 YAMAHA YZ125 ACTION WITHOUT THE TALKING HEADS OR MUSIC

• SUBSCRIBE TO MXA AND DIRT BIKES GET GET $50 IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN ATV/MC CREDITS


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MXA TEAM TESTED: MOTOOL SLACKER V4 BLUETOOTH SAG SCALE

The Motool Slacker V4 digital sag scale was created to help riders get more comfort and performance out of their motorcycles by helping them check their sag in an easier and quicker way. The amount of free sag and race sag your bike has directly correlates with its balance on the track. Motool has been producing Slacker digital suspension tuners since 2012. The V4 is the fourth-generation tuner and the first with Bluetooth accessibility for smartphones and the option to purchase a wireless remote that allows you to check your sag all by yourself (without help).

The Motool Slacker digital sag scale was created as an innovative replacement for the old-school, ruler-type sag sticks. All you had to do was turn the power on, hook the 32-inch cable to your fender, zero out the scale and have your buddy read your race sag off the screen (the original Slacker also came with a digital remote that was plugged into the Slacker unit so that you could read your own sag while sitting on your bike).The updates on the new Slacker V4 Bluetooth model simplify the task of checking your sag by making it a one-person job instead of a two-person job. Previously, if you wanted to check the sag on your Slacker scale by yourself, you had to plug the digital remote reader into the scale and dangle the wire from the handlebars to the rear wheel. Now, with Bluetooth capabilities, the remote is wireless. Plus, if you forget your remote at home or you’d prefer not to spend extra money on it, you can view your sag measurements on your smartphone. Previously, checking your sag required you to sit on the bike and have another person measure the amount of sag at the rear fender. To utilize the Bluetooth capabilities and check your sag by yourself, we recommend balancing on your bike by holding onto the top frame of an E-Z UP or by resting your arm on a truck. For accurate readings, make sure that your bike is on flat ground and your arm is only being used for balance and not to hold any of your weight.

The Motool Service Assistant app is available to download for free on Apple and Android devices. It turns your smartphone into a virtual remote display, giving you real-time readings on your sag measurements. Simply connect via Bluetooth from your smartphone to the app like you would when connecting your phone to the stereo in your vehicle. Additionally, the app provides a space for you to record measurements and keep notes on multiple bikes and their suspension settings. If you don’t want to bother with a smartphone, Motool has answered MXA’s wishes and updated its remote LCD display with new wireless capabilities. Using the remote is the simplest way to measure sag by yourself in the garage late at night.

The new V4 Slacker comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. If your bike doesn’t handle better after adjusting your sag with the Slacker V4 digital suspension tuner, you can return it, no questions asked. Plus, it comes with a two-year warranty if you have any structural issues with the Slacker.

DIGITS: $159.99 (main unit only), $189.99 (Slacker V4 + wireless remote display)—www.motool.com or (800) 741-7702.

MXA RATING: The Motool Slacker V4 digital suspension tuner will be your new best friend. It was created by racers for racers. Riders should check their sag at regular intervals to compensate for slop on the shock’s spring and internal valving. Being able to do it yourself means that you can do it whenever you like.

MXA VIDEO: WE TEST THE 2022 KTM 150SX

• TENTATIVE 2022 RACE SCHEDULES

2022 AMA SUPERCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Jan. 8…Anaheim, CA
Jan. 15…Oakland, CA
Jan. 22…San Diego, CA
Jan. 29…Anaheim, CA
Feb. 5…Glendale, AZ
Feb. 12…Anaheim, CA
Feb. 19… Minneapolis, MN
Feb. 26… Arlington, TX
Mar. 5…Daytona Beach, FL
Mar. 12…Detroit, MI
Mar. 19…Indianapolis, IN
Mar. 26…Seattle, WA
Apr. 9…St. Louis, MO
Apr. 16…Atlanta, GA
Apr. 23…Foxborough, MA
Apr. 30…Denver, CO
May 7…Salt Lake City, UT

2022 FIM GRAND PRIX CHAMPIONSHIP (TENTATIVE)
Feb. 20…Matterley Basin, England
Mar. 6…TBA, Argentina
Mar. 20…TBA
Mar. 27…Oss, Holland
April 10…Trentino, Italy
Apr. 24…Kegums, Latvia
May 1…Orlyonok, Russia
May 15…Rio Sardo, Sardinia.
May 29…Intu Xanadu, Spain
June 5…Ernee, France
June 12…Teutschenthal, Germany
June 26…Jakarta, Indonesia
July 3… Semarang, Indonesia
July 17…Locket, Czech Republic
July 24…Lommel, Belgium
Aug. 7…Uddevalla, Sweden
Aug. 14…KymiRing, Finland
Aug 21…St. Jean d’ Angely, France
Sept. 4…Afyonkarahisar, Turkey
Sept. 18…TBA

2022 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
May 28…Pala, CA
June 4…Hangtown, CA
June 11…Thunder Valley, CO
June 18…Mt. Morris, PA
July 3…Red Bud, MI
July 9…Southwick, MA
July 16….Millville, MN
July 23….Washougal, WA
Aug. 13…Unadilla, NY
Aug. 20…Budds Creek, MD
Aug. 27…Crawfordsville, IN
Sept. 3…Pala, CA

2022 KICKER ARENACROSS SERIES
Jan. 7-8…Loveland, CO
Jan. 15…Amarillo, TX
Jan. 21-22…Oklahoma City, OK
Jan. 29…Greensboro, NC
Feb. 4-5…Reno, NV
Feb. 11-12…Denver, CO

2022 WORCS OFF-ROAD SCHEDULE
Jan. 21-23…Primm, NV
Feb. 18-20…Glen Helen, CA
Mar. 11-13…Lake Havasu City, AZ
Apr. 8-10…Taft, CA
Apr. 29-May 1…Las Vegas, NV
May 27-29…Cedar City, UT
Sept. 16-18…Preston, ID
Oct. 14-16…Mesquite, NV
Nov 4-6…Primm, NV

2022 CANADIAN TRIPLE CROWN SERIES
June 5…Kamloops, BC
June 12…Drumheller, AB
June 19…Pilot Mound, MB
July 3…Walton, ON
July 10…Courtland, ON
July 17…Ottawa, ON
July 24…Moncton, NB
July 31…Deschambault, QC
Aug. 14…Walton, ON

2022 GERMAN ADAC MOTOCROSS MASTERS
Apr. 3…Princely Drehna
May 22…Dreetz
June 19…Möggers
July 3…Bielstein
July 10…Tensfeld
July 31…Gaildorf
Sept. 4…Jauer
Sept. 11…Holzgerlingen

2022 MICHELIN BRITISH CHAMPIONSHIP
Mar. 20…TBA
May 1…TBA
May 29…TBA
July 3…TBA
Aug. 7…TBA
Sept. 4…TBA

2022 IRISH NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
Mar. 27…TBA
Apr. 10…TBA
June 5… TBA
June 26… Loughbrickland
July 24…TBA
Aug. 21… Saul

2022 DUTCH MASTERS SERIES
Mar. 13…Arnhem
April 18…Oldebroek (Monday)
May 8…Harfsen
May22…Oss
June18…Rhenen

2022 MOTOCROSS DES NATIONS
Sept. 25… Red Bud.Michigan

• MXA VIDEO: WE TEST THE 2022 HUSQVARNA FC350

MXA YOUTUBE CHANNEL | HIT THAT SUBSCRIBE BUTTON

The MXA wrecking crew is everything moto related. Check out our MXA YouTube channel for bike reviews, Supercross coverage, rider interviews and much more. And don’t forget to hit that subscribe button.

• MXA PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: MOTOCROSS ACTION CASUAL WEAR

MXA PREMIX T-SHIRT—$29.95

MXA VINTAGE T-SHIRT—$29.95

MXA JAPANESE LOGO T-SHIRT—$29.95

MXA 80s T-SHIRT—$29.95

To see more MXA T-shirts and all the available colors Click Here

TALK MOTO WITH ON MXA’S FACEBOOK GROUP CHAT

We love everything moto and want to bring all moto junkies together into one place to share their two cents, ideas, photos, bike fixes, bike problems and much more. To check it out first you must need to or already have a Facebook account. If you don’t, it isn’t much work and you could even have an alias so nobody knows it is you. To join click HERE. After you request to join we will accept your request shortly after.

• FOLLOW MXA ON TWITTER

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Photos Credits: Debbi Tamietti, Kawasaki, KTM, MXGP, Trevor Nelson, Ray Archer, Jon Ortner, Brian Converse, Honda, Yamaha, Husqvarna, Daryl Ecklund, Yamaha, MXA archive

 

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