MXA’S WEEKEND NEWS ROUND-UP: SUPERCROSS IS 36 DAYS AWAY

• YOU GOTTA SEE THIS! MXA’S JOSH MOSIMAN FLIES A F-16 UPSIDE-DOWN

• THE L.A. COLISEUM IS ONE OF THE THREE SUPERMOTOCROSS PLAYOFF TRACKS, BUT WHY COULDN’T ONE BE ON AN OUTDOOR NATIONAL TRACK?

This is the motocross track where Red Bull hosted the Red Bull X-Fighters event before Red Bull built it up, but any National track could be turned in a combo-motocross/Supercross track.

If they insist on calling it “SuperMotocross” then wouldn’t it make sense to hold one of the three playoff rounds on an actual motocross track (and we aren’t talking about Pala). That would make “motocross” a bigger part of the three-race SuperMotocross play-offs. Otherwise, they should just call it the “SuperSupercross”playoffs.

This is what the same track looked  likewhen all the bleachers were in place.

It would be easier and cheaper to build a Supercross-style section at an outdoor facility  than in a stadium— and they could still use a legitimate portion of the outdoor track to at least give a nod to and important segment of the sport. All they would need is bleachers (and the sun is still up in September). The other round could be at a Super Speedway track, like Atlanta Motor Speedway, which combines Supercross with some of the speeds of motocross.

2023 SUPERMOTOCROSS PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
Sept. 9…TBA
Date TBA…TBA
Oct. 14: Los Angeles, CA

• HAESEKER RACING KTM 150SX VIDEO FOR THE PASHA SHOOTOUT: EPISODE 1

• MXA PHOTO OF THE WEEK: FIRST, YOU NEED A RIDER, THEN, A SETTING SUN & FINALLY A WILLING BERM

MXA’s Dennis Stapleton flew in from Kuwait in time to join the MXA gang in putting the 2023 YZ450F through its paces. We started at 7:00 a.m. and were still riding as the sun set—which gave Jon Ortner a chance to shoot this photo of Dennis in the dying of the light. Photo: Jon Ortner

• TWISTED DEVELOPMENT KTM 150SX VIDEO FOR THE PASHA SHOOTOUT: EPISODE 2

• 10TH ANNUAL KURT CASELLI RIDE DAY ON DEC. 3 AT PALA

The Kurt Caselli Foundation will host its 10th Annual Kurt Caselli Ride Day presented by Rocky Mountain ATV/MC, FMF and KTM on Saturday, December 3d, 2022 at Fox Raceway in Pala, California.

• ROB ANDREWS “THE INSIDE LINE: RACING THE 500 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS”

• 2022 FIRE & POLICE ELSINORE GRAND PRIX ON TUESDAY, DECEMBER 6…YES, TUESDAY

For more information or to sign-up go to www.firepolicemx.com

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 KAWASAKI KX250 VIDEO TEST

• WHAT IS THE MXA WRECKING CREW UP TO?

With Thanksgiving stealing a couple test days away from us, and the “Day in the Dirt” revamping the Glen Helen landscape, we went to Perris Raceway to get more time on our four 2023 125 two-strokes.

Then we snuck back into Glen Helen to put some serious break-in time on our 2023 Yamaha YZ450F out of sight of the armed guards. Just kidding, we couldn’t use the National track, but the “Saturday at the Glen” track was just sitting there. Photo: Jon Ortner

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 HUSQVARNA FC250 VIDEO TEST

• MXA PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: PRO-VUE PRESCRIPTION GOGGLES AVAILABLE IN 100% FRAMES


Pro-Vue has their prescription lens system available in the new 100% Accuri Gen 2 OTG goggle, and it is the best yet. Available in a half a dozen frame colors including this cool neon orange, and about a dozen different lens tints. Contact Pro-Vue at (507) 534-1247 or at www.pro-vue.com

MXA VIDEO: 2023 KTM 300SX FUEL-INJECTED TWO-STROKE VIDEO TEST

MXA TEAM TESTED: MOTOMASSAGER RECOVERY TOOL

The MotoMassager was created to help riders by warming up muscles before riding for increased performance and by massaging the muscles after riding to speed up recovery. The MotoMassager is quiet and easy to take with you to the track or gym. The MotoMassager uses percussion therapy to increase blood flow in your muscles. Percussion therapy has been around for a while, but it has gained more traction in recent years. The electric gun works like a jackhammer, creating rapid bursts of pressure in concentrated, short-duration pulses. These quick bursts of pressure agitate any area of the body you put it on, creating deep muscle stimulation that helps loosen up muscles. The stimulation improves blood flow, which helps speed up recovery and reduce muscle soreness.

For recovery, make sure to focus the gun on a sensitive area of your body, such as your forearms, upper arm, quadriceps (thigh muscles), hip flexor or IT bands (iliotibial bands). If one muscle is particularly tender after riding or working out, it’s likely your muscle has balled up so tightly to protect itself that it has formed a knot. This won’t repair itself quickly, because the knot is hindering blood flow in and out of the muscle. Blood is needed to bring nutrition to the muscle and to keep it hydrated. The increased blood flow also helps flush lactic acid from the sore area to speed up recovery time.

The most common nemesis in motocross is arm pump, and everyone has struggled with it to some extent or another. Some top Pros have scars all down their forearms from having surgery to open up their fascia tissue in an attempt to combat arm pump. Even that procedure doesn’t always work. Arm pump can come from inadequate bike setup, bad technique, nerves, fatigue, holding your breath and countless other things. The MotoMassager, and percussion therapy guns like it, will never completely cure the issue of arm pump for everyone, but it can help by improving blood flow before and after riding. Plus, it’s a lot better than surgery.

When you hammer a knot in your muscle, the idea is to break it up. Press and massage the muscle and then back off the gun so that blood flow can get in, then continue to press in again. Generally, people will experience significant initial release when using the massage gun, but because of this release, they often don’t continue to massage the area because it hurts. This leads to a relief that only lasts a little bit, and they miss out on the full benefits. Be sure to continue to massage the sore muscle, even after it feels better, to promote that blood flow.

This technology has been around for over 10 years now, and odds are you’ve seen percussion therapy in commercial ads before. The MotoMassager isn’t an original product discovered by riders, but it does work well and it comes in at a competitive price point compared to other massage guns. The MotoMassager comes with six different-shaped attachments for customizing the massage. We preferred the standard ball fitment for most muscles and liked the flat tip for warming up muscles because it is less abrasive.

The MXA test riders hadwo quibbles: First, the touchscreen display has a power button that can be confusing. It really acts as a start/stop button, because the on switch is actually on the bottom of the handle, next to the charging port. This didn’t make much sense. Second, the gun stops pulsing after five minutes, and you have to restart it again.

DIGITS: $149.00— www.motomassager.com or [email protected]

MXA RATING: Before learning how to use the massage gun, our testers didn’t feel the full benefits because they would only use it for a couple of minutes at a time. Once they learned to spend more time focusing on one area, they noticed improvements in recovery, and now they continue to use it.

• THE JEREMY MCGRATH STORY: IN HIS OWN WORDS AND THOSE OF HIS FRIENDS

• MXA PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT: MOTOCROSS ACTION CASUAL WEAR

MXA PREMIX T-SHIRT—$29.95

MXA VINTAGE T-SHIRT—$29.95

MXA JAPANESE LOGO T-SHIRT—$29.95

MXA 80s T-SHIRT—$29.95

To see more MXA T-shirts and all the available colors Click Here

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 KAWASAKI KX450 VIDEO TEST

• ON THE RECORD: COMPLETE TEST OF THE 2011 KTM 350SXF

This test is from the November 2005 issue of Motocross Action Magazine.


This 2011 KTM 350SXF test is from the September 2010 issues of MXA.

Q: FIRST AND FOREMOST, IS THE 2011 KTM 350SXF GOING TO CHANGE THE MOTOCROSS WORLD?

A: No. In truth, the 2011 KTM 350SXF is just another piece of the matrix of motocross. It is not going to wipe the 450cc motocross bike off the face of the Earth. It is not going to bring in a new era of mid-size engines. It is not a revolutionary idea (and if it is, then several other motocross manufacturers got there first, including, but not limited to, Husqvarna, ATK and the original Yamaha YZ400). It is essentially a niche motorcycle that fills a void. The KTM 350SXF is an interesting exercise, but if you think it will replace the 450cc motocross bike you are mistaken.

Q: WHO IS THE MOST LIKELY KTM 350SXF BUYER?

A: Given the way that the KTM 350SXF demands to be ridden, which we will get to in detail in a minute, it is not a plug-and-play replacement for a 450cc motocross bike. The 350SXF and its sibling, the 450SXF, are night-and-day different, which is surprising when they share so many components. If push came to shove, we’d say that there are three main buyers for the 2011 KTM 350SXF:

(1) Vet riders: For a Vet class rider who would prefer to race a 250cc bike, but can’t afford to give up 20 horsepower to his 450-equipped competition, the 350SXF offers all the charms of a very fast 250, with the torque curve of a slow 450. Although there are spots on the dyno curve where it gives up as much a 11 horsepower to the 450SXF.

(2) Play riders: When you aren’t bound by any rules, and are just looking for a fun bike to ride, the 350SXF is a little bit like owning a 450 at low rpm and a 250 at high rpm.

(3) 250 transplants: For a kid coming straight out of the 250 class for the 450 class, the 350SXF offers the familiarity of a high rpm, pin it to win it, flat-out 250 four-stroke—without the arm-stretching blast and bulk of a 450.

Q: IS THE 350SXF A BIG-BORE 250 OR A SLEEVED-DOWN 450?

A: Neither. The 60-pound, five-speed, DOHC, finger follower, four-valve, 349.7cc engine shares the design concept of the 250SXF in terms of weight, compactness and design, but few of the parts.The fuel-injected, electric start, KTM 350SXF engine shares very few parts with its brothers.

Q: WHAT IS THE BORE AND STROKE OF THE 250SXF, 350SXF AND 450SXF?

A: The 250SXF bore and stroke is 76mm x 54.8mm, the 350SXF is 88mm x 57.5mm and the 450SXF is 97mm x 60.8mm. The compression ratio on the 350SXF is 13.5:1.

Q: WHAT IS THE HEAD ANGLE OF THE 250SXF, 350SXF AND 450SXF?

A: All three bikes have the same 26.5-degree head angle.

Q: WHAT IS THE SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE OF THE2011  250SXF, 350SXF AND 450SXF?

A: The 2011 250SXF retails for $7699, the 350SXF goes for $8499 and the 450SXF sells for $8799.


2011 KTM 350SXF: KTM has always made bikes to fill niches. The 350SXF follows in the footsteps of the 150SX, 200XC and 300XC. It hits the Japanese brands where they ain’t.

Q: IS THE 2011 350SXF FASTER THAN THE 2011 450SXF?

A: No. Not even close. That isn’t to say that you couldn’t go faster on the 350SXF than you could on the 450SXF, but when the moments are frozen and pure performance is all that is measured, the 350SXF engine can’t hold a candle to the 450SXF engine.

Q: HOW MUCH HORSEPOWER DOES THE 350SXF MAKE ON THE DYNO

A: The 350SXF makes a respectable 46.94 horsepower at a very high 12,200 rpm.

Q: HOW DOES THE HORSEPOWER OF THE 350SXF COMPARE TO THE 250SXF AND 450SXF?

A: You don’t need to wear a deerstalker hat and smoke a pipe to figure out the answer to this question. It is elementary, my dear Watson. The 250SXF makes 38.25 horsepower, the 350SXF makes 46.94 horsepower and the 450SXF makes 53.92 horsepower. Rounded off, there is an 8 horsepower difference from the 250 to the 350 and from the 350 to the 450 (the 8 is a median number, in truth the gaps are larger above and below peak).

Q: WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM THE DYNO RUNS OF THE 250, 350 AND 450SXF’S?

A: First and foremost, if you aren’t bound by a class structure (if you are a Vet racer or a professional practice rider), there is no reason to ever buy a 250cc four-stroke again. Why not? Because the dyno curve, rpm range and revvability of the KTM 350 is identical to that of the KTM 250SXF—only with 6 to 10 horsepower more at every spot along the curve. In essence, the 350 has a 250 power curve, but with a better-than-works 250F powerband.

When it comes to comparing the 350SXF dyno curve to that of the KTM 450SXF, the 450 romps all over the 350 from 5000 rpm to, well, until the cows come home. At no point on the usable 450SXF powerband curve does the 350SXF make more horsepower than the 450. And, the 350SXF’s peak horsepower is at 12,200 rpm, while the 450SXF peaks at a much lower 8200 rpm.

Mathematically, the KTM 350SXF is to the 250SXF what the 450SXF is to the 350SXF. Say what?

Q: HOW GOOD IS THE POWERBAND ON THE MID-SIZE 2011 KTM 350SXF?

A: It’s good and it’s bad. It’s focused and it’s confused. It is, as you would expect from a machine that is trying to meld two worlds, a confused powerband. It is very much a Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde engine (or maybe two Dr. Jekylls without a Mr. Hyde).

The first personality is from low to mid. Off the bottom and into the mid-range, the 350SXF has a nice torquey feel. When it is on the track all by itself it feels like a 450, but it runs very much like a 1998 Yamaha YZ400. Smooth, tractable, pleasant and metered. Not fast, but usable. It feels like a 450, until you ride a 450 at the same rpm range—then it feels like a 350.

The second personality shows itself as the engine climbs into the top end. Unlike a 450, the 350SXF makes all of its serious horsepower above 10,000 rpm. Since it makes its most horsepower as the last rpm is wrung out of the engine at 12,200 rpm, you have to take it to the rev limiter if you want to make the 46.94 horsepower work for you (because at every rpm below max, it makes less and less horsepower). To be successful you have to rev it…really rev it.

Q: WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO RIDE THE 2011 KTM 350SXF?

A: Flat out. Think of it as a 250 four-stroke and ride it accordingly. Rev it out. Don’t shift until you hit 12-two. Never lug it down on the torque curve (unless you are going to or from the starting line). This bike is not a replacement for a 450cc motocross bike; it is closer to what a works 250 engine feels like (only it isn’t legal in the 250 class).

KTM’s fuel pump (upper right) is half the size of the fuel pumps on other EFI bikes.<

Q: CAN YOU REPROGRAM THE IGNITION?

A: Yes. Even better than fiddling with the world of software and laptop computers, there are three maps already programmed into the KTM’s ignition module. The only catch: You need to buy an optional $50 switch to access them. The three maps are aggressive, standard and soft. We used the aggressive map (which we chose because of issues with the stock gear ratios).

Q: WHAT DOES THE 2011 KTM 350SXF REALLY WEIGH?

A: KTM says that the 350SXF weighs 230.2 pounds, but on our scale it weighed 237 pounds (without gas—which is how they are weighed by the FIM and AMA). In a perfect world, the 2011 KTM 350SXF would weigh 220 pounds. Why? Because that is the minimum weight limit for a bike in the 450 AMA National class. Additionally, the inherent philosophy of building a mid-sized 350cc engine is that you can put it in a 250 frame and compensate for the loss of horsepower with a lower overall weight.

Q: WHERE DID THE WEIGHT COME FROM?

A: At 237 pounds, the 350SXF is not light. Why? Let’s assume that the typical 250F weighs 220 pounds. To make it into a 350SXF, you have to add in the beefed-up engine components, steel clutch basket, stronger frame and larger rear tire. That is conservatively about 6 pounds more. Next on the agenda is the fact that fuel-injected bikes typically weigh about 3 pounds more than a carbureted bike because of the electric fuel pump, thicker gas tank and added magnets of the magneto. Finally, KTM elected to mount an electric starter on the 350SXF. And, even though the KTM 350SXF starter motor is slightly smaller than the 450SXF unit, there are still the issues of the battery, starter gear and starter itself. All this weighs about 5 more pounds (because you get to deduct the weight of the kickstarter, kickstarter gear and idler gear). The total weight gain is 14 pounds. When you add 14 pounds to 220 pounds, you get a ballpark figure of 234 pounds. By this calculation, the 2011 KTM 350SXF is about 3 pounds heavier than it should be.

For comparison, the 2011 KTM 450SXF weighs 242 pounds. The 5 extra pounds are attributed to the 450’s larger cases, bigger crank and longer frame rails.

Q: WHAT WERE OUR BEST FORK SETTINGS?

A: We ran the same basic setup that we used on our KTM 450SXF (after all, there’s only a 5-pound weight difference). We dropped the stock 0.48 fork springs, which are way too soft) for the 0.50 springs from the 450SXF  and juggled the oil height to suit track conditions. For hardcore racing, we recommend this fork setup on the 2011 KTM 350SXF:
   Spring rate: 0.50 kg/mm (0.48 kg/mm stock)
   Oil height: 365cc (375 stock)
   Compression: 12 clicks out
   Rebound: 12 clicks out
   Fork leg height: 5mm up (at the first line)
   Note: In stock trim the forks hang down and lose a lot of travel. We ran stiffer springs to keep the forks higher and suggest that if you are 175 pounds or more that you do the same thing (then, lower the oil height to iron out the midstroke harshness). Oil height is a simple tuning trick for WP forks. Take 10c out if you think they are too harsh in the middle and add 10cc if your think they are too soft at the end of the stroke.


What would we change?
The gearing, oil filler cap, exhaust system, shock spring, ignition mapping, fork springs, preload adjuster, gas cap and radiator vent hose are all on the list.

Q: TO LINK OR NOT TO LINK?

A: The KTM 250/350/450SXF’s come with rising rate linkage, while the KTM 125SX, 150SX and 250SX two-strokes stick with the previous no-link PDS system. It is no secret that KTM did not want to go to Japanese-style rising-rate linkage, but they had no choice. Although their PDS no-link rear suspension had developed into a very good rear suspension system for those who knew how to set it up, public opinion forced the move to linkage.

When the rear wheel moves upward, the rising rate of the shock linkage’s arc forces the shock shaft to move faster (even though the rear wheel is still moving at a constant rate). Guess what? KTM’s no-link PDS system does the same thing. So what is the difference? The main difference is that the new linkage can be fine-tuned by changing the eccentric cam profile to make the shock have more damping at the very end of the stroke. On the other hand, the no-link system is lighter, easier to work on and produces a more linear spring progression. Scientifically, the most notable benefit of the linkage should be felt in the last inch of the shock’s stroke. We didn’t feel it.

Q: WHAT WAS OUR BEST SHOCK SETTING?

A: The rear suspension was harsh, a little choppy and still seemed prone to G’ing out (in spite of the benefits of the rising rate linkage). Our solution was to swap out the stock 5.4 shock spring for the 5.7 spring from the 2011 KTM 450SXF. This held the rear up higher and allowed us to balance out the chassis in coordination with the stiffer fork springs. Perhaps the most noticeable thing about the rear suspension on the 350SXF is that it feels remarkably similar to the no-link rear suspension that came on the KTM four-strokes last year. This should not come as a major surprise, since KTM used the same test riders that developed the no-link to develop the linkage. They know what they like and since they liked the PDS system, they worked with the KTM linkage system until they liked it too. If there is a difference between the linkage bike and the PDS bike it is that the linkage doesn’t seem to extend as far to the extremes in the rough as the PDS system. The rebound feels more contractive, although the compression stroke is identical.

For hardcore racing we recommend this shock setup for the 2011 KTM 350SXF:
   Spring rate: 5.7 kg/mm (5.4 kg/mm stock)
   Race sag: 100mm
   Hi-compression: 2-1/4 turns out
   Lo-compression: 15 clicks out
   Rebound: 12 clicks out
   Notes: Although KTM has often recommended 110mm or more of sag, but we think 100-105mm is better.

Q: HOW DOES THE 2011 KTM 350SXF HANDLE?

A: Every MXA test rider loved the accurate feel of the 350SXF. Once we resolved issues with the fork and shock spring rates, we were able to raise the fork height to select the amount of turn-in we wanted. Once you get the balance right, this bike corners like it’s on rails. We know for a fact that the 2011 Suzuki RM-Z450 turns sharper, but it sacrifices straight line stability for quickness in the tight stuff. The KTM is a better all-around chassis. It turns, but it doesn’t make sacrifices in your name at speed.

The 2011 model is much sleeker, smaller, lower and narrower-feeling at the top (and KTM was smart enough to keep the footpegs far enough apart to offer a firm stance in the rough stuff). KTM went from the bottom of the heap to the top by making small changes every model year. A lot of the credit may well go to the tunability of steel frames when compared to cast or forged aluminum frames.

Since the KTM 350SXF is only slightly lighter than the 450SXF and is raced in the same class we stiffened both ends.

Q: WHAT DID MXA DO TO MAKE THE KTM 350SXF WORK BETTER?

A: Here is the list:

(1) Reprogram. We went from the standard ignition curve to the “aggressive” curve. This is ignition timing only, not fuel mapping. To access the maps you need KTM’s optional adjuster dial ($49.60 from your local dealer).

(2) Gearing. We geared it down one tooth (from 50 to 51), and several MXA test riders chose to gear it down two teeth to 52. The stock gap between gears is too large. With the stock setup, the bike has a hard time making the jump from second to third, and it takes a long straight to get the rpm up to the rev limiter. Gearing it down one tooth helps the second-to-third shift and brings the rev limiter into sight. Gearing it down two teeth makes third gear more usable. The long pull may seem like a good thing, but if you don’t get to 12,2000 you aren’t reaching max horsepower. Translated that means that for every rpm below 12,200 you are losing power.

(3) Exhaust system. We borrowed a Mike Alessi replica Factory 4.1 exhaust system from www.fmfracing.com and it romped. It delivered excellent performance, and the proof was that MXA‘s 52-tooth aficionados returned to 51 teeth because the power carried better.

(4) Springs. Every MXA test rider demanded that we go stiffer on the springs (front and rear).

(5) Locking gas cap. We cut off the tangs on KTM’s irritating gas cap to disable the locking device (if you do it just right, the gas cap will click off and you won’t need to use two hands to open it).

(6) Radiator vent hose. The stock silicone radiator vent hose vents directly onto the head pipe. Bad idea. We installed a longer vent hose that dumped out under the engine.

We replaced the stock oil filler cap after we unscrewed it with our boots. We used an aluminum cap.

(7) Oil filler cap.If you wear motocross boots with hinges, the hinges can hook on the black plastic oil filler cap and unscrew it. You have three choices:
      (a) Clip the winglets off of the plastic oil filler cap;
      (b) Switch to an aluminum oil filler cap;
      (c) Buy new boots—without hinges.

Q: WHAT DID WE HATE?

A: The hate list:

(1) Radiator overflow tube. When water spits out of the overflow, the head pipe produces a steam cloud.

(2) Oil filler cap. We had the oil filler cap on the right side of the engine unwind during a moto. We installed a smaller and sleeker KTM accessory filler cap.

(3) Water pump gasket.
We knocked the water pump in a crash and dislodged the water pump gasket — causing a major water leak.

(4) Shock preload ring. Hated it. It’s much harder to use than last year’s simple aluminum ring. The new nylon preload ring deforms easily and, for some reason, it is very hard to turn. KTM says not to hit it with a hammer and punch, but we had no choice.

(5) Gear ratios. They must work for someone, but not us. There is a big gap between second and third.

(6) Weight. This would be an incredible bike at 220 pounds, amazing at 225 pounds, awesome at 230 pounds, but the 237 pounds isn’t a check mark in the “plus” category.

(7) Rims. The Excel rims on MXA‘s race bike were buttery soft. We chased the spokes with a vengeance. KTM says that they will replace all of the soft rims on the showroom bikes.

Q: WHAT DID WE LIKE?

A: The like list:

(1) Gas line quick-release. Thanks to a push-button quick-release, the gas tank can be removed from the frame without any drama.

(2) Optional kickstart. If you want a lighter 350SXF, you can install a kickstarter on the 350SXF. You get to remove the starter, battery and drive gear, but you need to add a kickstarter, kickstart shaft, idler gear and case plug.

(3) Multi-purposing. The water pump, counter-balancer and timing chain gear are all gear-driven from the primary gear.

(4) Fuel tank. At 1.98 gallons of gas, the KTM 350SXF tank is a half-gallon larger than the gas tanks on the Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki or Yamaha EFI bikes.

(5) Steel frame. The steel frame is 5mm lower than the old frame and 15mm wider at the footpegs; KTM went through 24 different frame variations in rigidity. As for the weight of the chromoly frame, the KTM frame is one pound lighter than any aluminum frame sold.

(6) Steel clutch basket. Although this may seem like a low-tech idea, we loved the steel clutch basket on the 350SXF (it is similar to the basket used in the old-style KTM RFF engine). It will not wear out, and since the clutch spins one-third as fast as the engine and in a reverse rotation, its weight doesn’t add flywheel effect. KTM used the steel clutch basket becasue it has a thinner profile that allowed the engine cases to be narrower.

(7) Lifting. Finally, KTM has provided a hand hold to lift the bike onto a stand.

(8) Handling. Nothing handles as well as a KTM. Five years ago MXA was saying nothing handled as badly as a KTM.

(9) Sound. On the FIM’s two-meter-max test, the KTM pumped out 115.7 dB. It also passed the AMA’s 94 dB test at 4500 pm.

Q: WHAT DO WE REALLY THINK?

A: Once upon a time, there was a little girl named Goldilocks. After breaking into and vandalizing the home of some local citizens, she ate their food. “This porridge is too hot!” she exclaimed. So, she tasted the porridge from the second bowl. “This porridge is too cold,” she said. So, she tasted the last bowl of porridge. “Ahhh, this porridge is just right,” she said happily, and she ate it all up. She is currently doing one-to-five in Joliet for a B&E. How does this relate to the 350SXF? Think about it.

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 SUZUKI RM-Z450 VIDEO TEST

• 2023 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS RACE SCHEDULE 

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 GASGAS MC350F VIDEO TEST

 2023 AMA SUPERCROSS RACE SCHEDULE

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 YAMAHA YZ450F VIDEO TEST

• FIM WORLD MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP RACE SCHEDULE

• MXA VIDEO: 2023 SUZUKI RM-Z250 VIDEO TEST

• LOOKING TO THE FUTURE: THE 2023 RACE SCHEDULES

2023 AMA SUPERCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Jan. 7…Anaheim, CA
Jan. 14…Oakland, CA
Jan. 21…San Diego, CA
Jan. 28…Anaheim, CA
Feb. 4…Houston, TX
Feb. 11…Tampa, FL
Feb. 25…Arlington, TX
Mar. 4…Daytona Beach, FL
Mar. 11…Indianapolis, IN, MI
Mar. 18…Detroit, MI
Mar. 25…Seattle, WA
Apr. 8…Glendale AZ
Apr. 15…Atlanta, GA
Apr. 22…East Rutherford, NJ
Apr. 29…Nashville, TN
May 6…Denver, CO
May 13…Salt Lake City, UT

2023 SUPERMOTOCROSS PLAYOFF SCHEDULE
Sept. 9…TBA
Date TBA…TBA
Oct. 14: Los Angeles, CA

2023 AMA ARENACROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Nov. 18, 2022…Albany, GA
Nov. 25, 2022…Albany, NY
Jan. 6…Loveland, CO
Jan.13…Prescott, AZ
Jan. 20…Guthrie, OK
Jan. 27….Guthrie, OK
Feb. 3…Reno, NV
Feb. 10…Denver, CO
Feb. 24…Hobbs, NM
Mar. 3…Amarillo, TX
Mar. 10…Tulsa, OK
Mar. 17…Salem, VA
Mar. 24…Little Rock, AR
Mar. 31…Lexington, KY

2023 2023 FIM WORLD MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Mar. 12…Argentina
Mar. 26…TBA
Apr. 10…TBA
Apr. 16…Italy
Apr. 30…Portugal
May 7…Spain
May 21…France
Jun. 4…Latvia
Jun. 11…Germany
Jun. 25…Indonesia
July 2…Indonesia
July 16…Czech Rep.
July 23…Belgium
Aug. 6…Finland
Aug. 13…Sweden
Aug. 20…Holland
Sept. 3…Turkey
Sept. 17…Vietnam
Oct. 1…TBA
Oct. 15…England

2023 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
May 27…Pala, CA
June 3…Hangtown, CA
June 10…Thunder Valley, CO
June 17…Mt. Morris, PA
July 1…Red Bud, MI
July 8…Southwick, MA
July 15…Millville, MN
July 22…Washougal, WA
Aug. 11…Unadilla, NY
Aug. 19…Budds Creek, MD
Aug. 26…Crawfordsville, IN

2023 “SATURDAY AT THE GLEN” SCHEDULE
Jan. 14…Winter Series #1 (Saturday track)
Jan.. 28…Winter Series #2 (National track)
Feb. 3…Winter Series #3 (Saturday track)
Feb. 11…Winter Series #4 (Saturday track)
Feb. 25…Winter Series #5 (National track)
Mar. 11…Spring Series #1 (Saturday track)
Mar. 25…Spring Series #2 (Saturday track)
Apr. 15…Spring Series #3 (Saturday track)
Apr. 22…Spring Series #4 (Saturday track)
May 13…Spring Series #5 (National track)
June 1…Summer Series #1 (Saturday track)
June 17…Summer Series #2 (Saturday track)
June 24…Summer Series #3 (Saturday track)
July 15…Summer Series #4 (Saturday track)
July 29….Summer Series #5 (National track)
Aug.19…Fall Series #1 (Saturday track)
Aug. 26…Fall Series #2 (Saturday track)
Sept. 16…Fall Series #3 (Saturday track)
Sept. 23…Fall Series #4 (Saturday track)
Sept. 30…Fall Series #5 (National track)
Oct. 24…Winter Series #1 (Saturday track)
Oct. 28…Winter Series #2 (National track)
Nov.3-5…World Vet Championship (National track)
Nov. 19..Winter Series #3 (Saturday track)
Dec. 2…Winter Series #4 (Saturday track)
Dec. 9…Winter Series #5 (National track)

2023 VET MOTOCROSS DES NATIONS
Aug. 24-28…Foxhill, GB

2023 MOTOCROSS DES NATIONS
Oct. 22…Ernee, France

2023 WORLD VET MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Nov. 3-5…Glen Helen, CA

2023 RED BULL DAY IN THE DIRT
Nov. 24-26…Glen Helen,CA

BONES BACON’S AMAZING LOVE FOR THE HONDA TRAIL 90, TRAIL 110 AND ALL-NEW TRAIL 125

• 2023 SOBOBA TRAIL RIDE WILL BE ON FEBRUARY 26, 2023

For more info go to www.sobobarides.biz/home

• HOW SMART DO YOU HAVE TO BE TO SUBSCRIBE TO MXA? YOU SUBSCRIBE AND GET A $25 ROCKY MOUNTAIN GIFT CREDIT—SEEMS SIMPLE


You can’t afford not to subscribe, because when you order a subscription, Rocky Mountain ATV/MC sends you a $25 gift credit to use on anything you want from their massive selection. Plus, subscribers to MXA can also choose to get the digital mag on their iPhone, iPad, Kindle or Android by going to the Apple Store, Amazon or Google Play or in a digital version. Even better, you can subscribe to Motocross Action and get the awesome print edition delivered to your house by a uniformed employee of the U.S. Government. Do we have to mention the $25 Rocky Mountain ATV/MC gift card again? You can’t lose on this deal? Call (800) 767-0345 or Click Here

•  THE REMAINING RACES OF THE 2022 SEASON

The “Saturday at the Glen” races only have two events left in 2022 (on December 3 and December 10), then it starts up again after the Holidays.

2022 SATURDAY AT THE GLEN RACE SCHEDULE
Apr. 2…Spring Series #1
Apr. 23…Spring Series #2
Apr. 30…Spring Series #3
May 7…Spring Series #4
May 14…Spring Series #5 (National Track)
June 11…Summer Series #1
June 25…Summer Series #2
July 9…Summer Series #3
July 30…Summer Series #5
Aug. 13…Summer Series #6  & Pasha 125 Open (National Track)
Aug. 27…..Fall Series #1
Sept. 10…Fall Series #2
Sept. 17…Fall Series #3
Oct. 1…Fall Series #4 & Pasha 125 Open (National Track)
Oct. 15…Fall Series #5
Oct. 22…Fall Series #6
Oct. 29…Winter Series #1 (National Track)
Nov. 5-6…Dubya World Vet Championship (National Track)
Nov. 19…Winter Series #2
Dec. 3…Winter Series #3
Dec. 10…Winter Series #4 (National Track)

2022 AUSTRALIAN SUPERCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Oct. 21…Melbourne, Vic
Oct. 29…Adelaide, SA
Nov. 26…Newcastle, NSW
Dec. 3…Wagga Wagga, NSW

2022 MOTOCROSS DES NATIONS
Sept. 25… Red Bud, MI

2022 WORLD VET MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Nov. 5-6…Glen Helen, CA

2022 PARIS SUPERCROSS
Nov. 12-13… Paris, France

MXA YOUTUBE CHANNEL | HIT THAT SUBSCRIBE BUTTON

The MXA wrecking crew is everything moto related. Check out our MXA YouTube channel for bike reviews, Supercross coverage, rider interviews and much more. And don’t forget to hit that subscribe button.

• TALK MOTO WITH ON MXA’S FACEBOOK GROUP CHAT

We love everything moto and want to bring all moto junkies together into one place to share their two cents, ideas, photos, bike fixes, bike problems and much more. To check it out first you must need to or already have a Facebook account. If you don’t, it isn’t much work and you could even have an alias so nobody knows it is you. To join click HERE. After you request to join we will accept your request shortly after.

• FOLLOW MXA ON TWITTER

mxactiontwitter1Follow us to see fresh content every day at www.twitter.com/MXAction or on Twitter at “MXAction.hotos Credits: Trevor Nelson, MXGP, National Motorcycle Museum, American Motocross, Josh Mosiman, Kawasaki, GasGas, KTM, HRC, Husqvarna, Daryl Ecklund, Yamaha, MXA archive

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