MXA’S WEEKEND NEWS ROUND-UP: THE NATIONALS ARE ON A ROLL AND THE WORLD VET TAKES OFF FOUR MONTHS EARLY

GODSPEED! DEREK RICKMAN (1933-2021)

Derek and Don Rickman in action on their own brand

British motorcycle icon Derek Rickman, who passed away July 3, 2021, after a short battle with cancer at Oakhaven Hospice in Lymington , was along with his younger brother Don the driving force of British motocross superiority in the 1960s. The Rickmans brothers represented Britain at the Motocross des Nations with Derek being on the winning team five times (1959, 1960, 1963, 1964 and 1966). And brother Don joined him on the winning MXDN team in 1963 and 1964.


Don and Derek Rickman.

Derek said about this era, “We realized if we were going to get anywhere in the international sport we were going to have to have lighter machines. We built our own frames and they turned out to be very successful.” Originally the Rickman Metisses housed big British four-stroke singles from BSA. Matchless and Triumph. They developed their exquisite frame kits by racing them and Rickman Metisses became highly prized—especially in America because they were 30 pounds lighter than the production versions. With their nickel-plated, large-diameter, Reynolds 531 tubing, they set the standard for high quality.

A Rickman Montesa two-stroke.

The Rickmans were producing 4000 bikes a year once they started making two-strokes with Bultaco, Montesa, Zundapp and Hodaka engines in them for the American market. Later they made street bikes frame kits.

A 1968 Rickman BSA.

In 1974, the Rickmans were awarded the “Queen’s Award to Industry” for their export business and Derek and Don Rickman were inducted into the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 2007.

DON AND DERECK RICKMAN’S AMA HALL OF FAME VIDEO

• “THIS WEEK IN MXA” WITH JOSH MOSIMAN: TALKIN’ CONTRACTS WITH AARON PLESSINGER

• 2021 AMA NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP POINTS HEADING TO SOUTHWICK ON SATURDAY


For all of Dylan Ferrandis’ late moto heroics, he is only 14 points ahead of Ken Roczen in the title chase.

450 AMA NATIONAL POINTS STANDINGS
(After 4 of 12 rounds)
1. Dylan Ferrandis (Yam)…179
2. Ken Roczen (Hon)…165
3. Aaron Plessinger (Yam)…143
4. Chase Sexton (Hon)…132
5. Eli Tomac (Kaw)…129
6. Justin Barcia, (Gas)…121
7. Adam Cianciarulo (Kaw)…116
8. Christian Crraig (Yam)…104
9. Cooper Webb (KTM)…102
10. Marvin Musquin (KTM)…90

Everyone is waiting for Pro Circuit Kawasaki’s powerhouse duo of Austin Forkner (38) and Jo Shimoda (30) to show what they’ve got.

250 AMA NATIONAL POINTS STANDINGS
(After 4 of 12 rounds)
1. Jett Lawrence (Hon)…172
2. Justin Cooper (Yam)…164
3. Hunter Lawrence (Hon)…128
4. R.J. Hampshire (Hus)…111
5. Jeremy Martin (Yam)…108
6. Jalek Swoll (Hus)…108
7. Garrett Marchbanks (Yam)…103
8. Jo Shimoda (Kaw)…99
9. Colt Nichols (Yam)…97
10. Austin Forkner (Kaw)..87

2021 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS WINNERS AT A GLANCE

There have been four 250 Nationals and four different winners. R.J. Hampshgire joins the victory parade—even if he fell down a couple times.

Venue                                                                       450                                    250
May 29…Pala, CA………………………Dylan Ferrandis…………..Jett Lawrence
June 5….Thunder Valley, CO…….Ken Roczen………………….Justin Cooper
June 19…Mt. Morris, PA…………..Dylan Ferrandis……………Jalek Swoll
July 3…Red Bud, MI…………………..Dylan Ferrandis……………R.J. Hampshire
July 10…Southwick, MA
July 17….Millville, MN
July 24….Washougal, WA
Aug. 14…Unadilla, NY
Aug. 21…Budds Creek, MD
Aug. 28…Crawfordsville, IN
Sept. 4…Pala, CA
Sept.11…Hangtown, CA
450 points leader…Dylan Ferrandis
250 points leader…Jett Lawrence

• DYLAN FERRANDIS ON HOW IMPROVED THE YZ450F IS THIS YEAR

Aaron Plessinger and Dylan Ferrandis are making the YZ450F look good.

HAS STAR RACING REALLY IMPROVED THE YAMAHA 450 THAT MUCH? I don’t know. As you said, I was not on the 450, so I can’t really tell. What I do know is that since I moved to the 450 class, and since Star Racing got the 450 programs, we just put so much work on the bike, with trying different changes to everything on the bike. It takes time; the bike was not that great in Supercross because we were developing it, and then trying different stuff. We learned a lot during the Supercross season. Then we had some time between Supercross, and motocross and we fixed any small problems. Now we have a bike that is good for racing! My teammate Aaron Plessinger has been riding well, and we put two Yamaha bikes on the podium today, which is awesome. We all worked so hard to get the bike good, and we finally found the solutions.

READY FOR TWENTY-TWO? MXA’S 2022 KTM 250SXF VIDEO TEST

MXA TEAM TESTED: HOOSIER IMX25S STIFF SIDEWALL TIRES

Before the 2021 World Two-Stroke Championship, MXA put Hoosier IMX25S front tires and IMX25 rear tires on all eight of our race team bikes. Following the big weekend, we tested the Hoosiers at three different racetracks for weeks on end.

(1) Front tire. Just like works tires, Hoosier motocross tires come in different compounds. For our purposes, we focused on the IMX25S front and IMX25 rear. As a front tire, our go-to choice is the 100/80-21 MX25S. The “S” stands for “stiff construction.” We preferred the stiffer sidewalls to the previous soft carcass, because the softer compound rubber rolled over too much and wore out too quickly. The stiffer carcass of the IMX25S improved lean angle grip and response to input (without any cushy delays) and delivered both increased braking performance and straight-line stability. There is also a Hoosier IMX30S front tire that offers more durability.

(2) Rear tire. On the rear of our eight World Two-Stroke race bikes, we elected to run the 110/90-19 IMX25 (C100) on our 125cc and 150cc machines, because the Hoosier 110-size tires run smaller than their competitors’ 110s, which makes the Hoosier 110 rear closer to the size of a standard 100 from the other brands. Additionally, we elected to run a Hoosier 120/80-19 tire on our 250 and 300 two-strokes because their 120 profile splits the difference between a standard-sized 110 and 120. Overall, we actually preferred Hoosier’s rear tire sizes, because we think that modern 125/150cc two-strokes need more meat, while 250/450 two- and four-strokes don’t handle as well with a big 120 rear. The middle-ground Hoosier 120 gives you a little bit of 110 feel with 120 grip. If you are worried about reliability, wear and lifespan, Hoosier has an IMX30 rear tire that gives up a little performance for more durability.

(3) Weight. The first-generation Hoosiers were very light, but the new C100 version’s stiffer sidewall cuts down on the weight advantage. The tires are still approximately 1 pound less than their competitors. All Hoosier tires are directional and must be mounted on the wheels with the arrows aimed in the direction of travel.

(4) Performance. First off, every test rider loved the Hoosier MX25S front tire. It felt plusher than a Dunlop MX33 and tracked straighter. The rubber compound offered excellent grip, whether in intermediate terrain or hardpack. We did fiddle around with air-pressure settings from 13 psi to 15 psi to fine-tune the feel, but that depended on track conditions. On harder dirt, we preferred the higher pressure; in loam, we stuck with 14 psi.

The Hoosier IMX25 (C100) rear tire delivers a different feel from a Pirelli, Bridgestone or Dunlop tire. At first, we weren’t used to a tire that absorbed so much energy, hooked up so aggressively and followed the ground so well. The big highlight of the Hoosier tire was its straight-line traction. The C100 designation on the tire refers to the new stiffer sidewalls, which are not just on the IMX25S front tire but also the rear. 

We elected to run the IMX25 tires, front and rear, for their performance. We skipped the MX20 and the MX30 tires because we felt that one was too soft and the other a tad stiff. By choosing the IMX25S front and IMX25-C100 rear, we knew we were giving up the durability of the IMX30s. Thus, we had no expectation that these tires would wear like iron. We had two quibbles with our Hoosiers: (1) The Hoosier logo is stenciled on to the side of the tire, but there is overspray and it doesn’t last longer than a couple motos. (2) Tire life depends on terrain and usage, but expect to change them more often than other brands.

DIGITS? $91.00 (MX25S front), $98.00 (IMX25 rear), $96.00 (IMX30 rear)—www.hoosiertire.com or (574) 784-3152.

MXA RATING: We love these tires. The three different rubber compounds allow the rider to pick and choose how much grip he wants (and conversely how long the tire lasts). This is as close as a local racer can get to a works rubber compound. But like all works tires, it delivers lots of grip, but has a shorter lifespan.

• SEE IT NOW! AMA NATIONAL TV SCHEDULE: SOUTHWICK BROADCAST ON NBCSN THE NEXT DAY AT 1:00 P.M. (EASTERN)


Don’t put your trust in this official TV broadcast schedule. As many discovered with the first AMA National broadcast, it can change suddenly and without warning. Also, take a close look at the broadcast times on the over-the-air NBC Sports showings that the majority of people rely on. For example, note that there are several next day showings—most notably Southwick, Budds Creek and Hangtown. And check out the date and time of the Washougal broadcast on NBC Sports.

• THE AUGUST 2021 ISSUE OF MXA IS ON IT’S WAY? SUBSCRIBE! IT IS THE BEST DEAL IN THE SPORT

What’s in the August issue of MXA? There are close-up photos and details on the 2022 Hondas, KTMs and Husqvarnas. Plus , we ride the 2021 World Two-Stroke Championship winning Yamaha YZ300 from Twisted Development to see what’s under the hood. In an effort to get out of town and up in the mountains, we tested a 2021 Yamaha YZ250FX cross-country bike. We sat down with two distinctly different people for this issues. Craig Shoemaker filled us in on how Fly/WPS survived the Covid pandemic and what the aftereffects will be on the 2021 riding year. Then, we interviewed the “fiercest man in motocross.” Heikki Mikkola couldn’t have been nicer to MXA. He answered all of our questions and told us some amazing facts about his Grand Prix career. And, as the ultimate kicker, we had Jamie Ellis build us a full-race, no holds barred KTM 450SXF. It was so fast that even the Pros ran it on the mellow map!

HOW TO SUBSCRIBE TO MXA SO THAT YOU NEVER MISS ANOTHER ISSUE, PLUS GET A $25 ROCKY MOUNTAIN GIFT CREDIT TO COVER YOUR COSTS

If you subscribe to MXA you can get the mag on your iPhone, iPad, Kindle or Android by going to the Apple Store, Amazon or Google Play or in a digital version. Even better you can subscribe to Motocross Action and get the awesome print edition delivered to your house by a uniformed employee of the U.S. Government. Did we mention the $25 gift card for any part you want from Rocky Mountain ATV/MX? You can call (800) 767-0345 or Click Here (or on the box at the bottom of this page) to subscribe.

BELIEVE IT OR NOT! 400 RIDERS HAVE PRE-ENTERED THE NOV. 5-7 WORLD VET CHAMPIONSHIP FOUR MONTHS EARLY

Over 400 riders pre-entered the 2021 World Vet Championship in June for the November 5-7 World Vet Championships. This is the largest pre-race entry in the 37 year history of the event. Not only that, but among the the anxious American Vets, there were also entries from Canada, Spain, Bulgaria, Mexico, England and Belgium. In June Glen Helen offered a 40% off the pre-entry entry fee, which help spur entries and in July they are still offering 20% off (which will shrink to 10 % off in August).

The Dubya World Vet MX Championships are approaching November 5-7, 2021. Online pre-entries  for the Dubya World Vet MX Championships are now live and can be submitted now! You can save money and receive the best price for Saturday and Sunday entries if you register in the month of July. Glen Helen is offering a 20% discount on all pre-entry fees for the month of June.  In August the discount drops to 10% off the entry fees. Glen Helen wants you to enjoy this weekend of fun with a premier deal!

Don’t wait to purchase your pre-entry, Glen Helen is only offering 20% off for July! To pre-enter now go to www.glenhelen.com/register/

Interested in forming a team  or getting a list to join your nations team for the 2021 World Vet Cup of Nations? CLICK HERE to apply!

 MXA 125 TWO-STROKE SHOOTOUT: GASGAS MC 125, TM 125MX, HUSKY TC125, YAMAHA YZ125 & KTM 125SX

NOW THAT THE FIM IS GONE FROM THE USA, WE TELL YOU HOW THE FIM GOT CONTROL OF AMERICAN SUPERCROSS IN THE FIRST PLACE

No one involved in the Supercross wars in 2001 was fighting for the sport, the riders, higher purses or safer tracks. They all wanted the dollars that came with the butts in the seats. The FIM was just a way for the promoters to keep the money.

Dear MXA,

Why is the American Supercross series sanctioned by the FIM? The Euros have nothing to do with Supercross, but they bring their rules, not to mention WADA, to a country that was doing fine without them. How did they get control of Supercross?

Where there is money, there are people willing to play for keeps. Back in 2001, the AMA and Clear Channel, then the promoting group of Supercross, engaged in a civil war over who would run Supercross. The AMA had been the sanctioning body for the vast majority of Supercross races held in the United States since the very first one on July 8, 1972. As the sanctioning body, the AMA was the ombudsman for the riders, rule book and sport. Its job was to look out for the best interest of the sport, ensure fair competition, protect the riders and run the races. A sanctioning body should act as the middleman between the spirit of the sport and the realities of the business aspects of the sport.

Clear Channel was the promoter of 15 of the 16 AMA Supercross rounds (albeit under names like Pace Motorsports, SFX and Live Nation over the years). A promoter’s job is to hold the races. The race promoter makes the majority of his money by selling sponsorship packages to energy drink bottlers, motorcycle manufacturers, software developers, tire companies and automobile firms. They also reap the benefit of selling tickets, souvenirs and concessions to live audiences.

The sanctioning body makes its money by charging sanctioning fees to the promoter, collecting gate money for rider entries, charging for AMA Pro licenses and selling title sponsorships (in competition and conflict with the race promoters, who also want to do the same thing). It is in the area of title sponsorship that sanctioning bodies and promoters most often come to loggerheads.

THE 2001 CIVIL WAR: The 2001 Supercross civil war came about when the AMA and Clear Channel were unable to come to an agreement on a future contract (the then-current contract expired at the end of the 2002 season). The sticking points were profit sharing, sanctioning fees and sponsorship rights. Clear Channel said that it didn’t need the AMA and would run its own Supercross series. In response, the AMA declared its intention to run its own Supercross series head-to-head against the Clear Channel-promoted series in 2003.

Clear Channel’s advantage in the battle was that it had agreements with most of the major stadiums and arenas in the country and experience holding Supercross events. On the AMA side of the war was a big club called “fiduciary rights.” This legal term became very important because, as interpreted, it said that the motorcycle manufacturers who were members of the AMA Board of trustees could do nothing that would harm the AMA—because as board members, they had a “fiduciary responsibility” to support the organization that they governed.

On one hand, you had a promoting group that had the stadiums wrapped up, and, on the other hand, you had a sanctioning body that had the riders and factory teams caught in a legal conundrum. One thing that everyone who was involved on the rider and team side of things in 2001 knew was that promoting group should not be the sanctioning bodies. Why not? If a decision had to be made that meant more money for Clear Channel or an improvement in the riders’ well being, the promoting groups would always look out for their bottom line. It’s no secret that previous Clear Channel management teams abused their power, brow beat privateers, banned the press and were anything but benevolent to the sport. Their heavy handedness eventually culminated in the 1995 Las Vegas rider strike and their attempt to have Jeremy McGrath banned from the sport. Nobody wants absolute power in the hands of a corporation.

By the same token, sanctioning bodies should not promote races. Their job is to look out for the welfare of the riders, integrity of the sport and long-term future of all involved (and that includes race promoters). They can’t do that when they are money hungry.

THE PRE-PRE 2001 CIVIL WAR: The 2001 Clear Channel-versus-AMA civil war was not the first time the AMA and a promoting group got in a battle. Ten years earlier, the AMA tried to take over a road race series from the promoter who developed it. They got tagged for $3,000,000 after the promoter’s lawyers were through with them (and the circumstances were remarkably similar to the 2001 Supercross spat).

On the Supercross legal front, history shows that arguing is part of the deal. In 1984, the Supercross promoters broke away from the AMA to form their own series. The hastily assembled Insport series and its AIR sanctioning body only lasted for a short time—but the record books are a mess because of it. In 1984, Jeff Ward won the AMA Supercross title (a two-race series), while Johnny O’Mara earned the 15-race Insport crown.

THE AMA SUES THE RACE TEAMS IN 1982: Additionally, the Big Four manufacturers were sued by the AMA in 1982 when the factory teams pulled out of the AMA Trans-USA series to race the non-AMA sanctioned CMC Trans-Cal series. The factory teams lost that lawsuit because as members of the AMA Board of Directors, they were bound by “fiduciary responsibility” to support the organization they directed. The manufacturers had to pay the AMA a settlement.

Back in 2001, Clear Channel started locking up long-term exclusivity deals with several major stadiums, including Anaheim, Dallas, Phoenix and Minneapolis. The goal was to keep the AMA out.

THE BATTLE THAT GOT THE FIM INVOLVED: As for the AMA, it signed a contract with Chicago-based entertainment group Jam Sports to become the promoter of the proposed 2003 AMA Supercross series. Jam Sports took the job seriously and began rounding up whatever venues were possible Supercross sites. The AMA and Jam Sports’ plan was to hold as many 2003 Supercross events as possible on the same weekend as Clear Channel’s events—with the knowledge that the factory teams would have to race with them. Psychologically, they also knew that the Japanese corporate bosses saw the AMA as the one-and-only motorcycle organization in the United States and, most important, the official federation of the FIM (International Motorcycle Federation). Since the Japanese manufacturers field more than just American motocross teams, the AMA was their one-stop shopping association.

No sport, no matter how strong and powerful it thinks it is, is immune to collapse. The AMA/Clear Channel discord smacked of the CART/IRL fiasco. And, if you know anything about championship auto racing, you know that both series were demeaned by their bitter fight. The powerful CART turned out to be the surprise loser, but Indy Car racing never returned to the glory it had before the nasty breakup.

THE SUPERCROSS PROMOTER’S LATERAL ARABESQUE: It didn’t appear as though the AMA and Clear Channel could resolve their differences without going to court. But, Clear Channel had an ace in the hole. An outside promoter, who worked for Clear Channel, told his bosses that the solution to their problem was to skip over the AMA and sanction the 2003 Clear Channel Supercross series with the FIM. Since the FIM was the world-wide sanctioning body of all motorcycle racing (and the AMA was an affiliate of the FIM), if they became an FIM-sanctioned event, the Big Four manufacturers could race with Clear Channel without violating their fiduciary responsibility to the AMA—because the AMA was under the FIM umbrella.

And that is how the FIM became the sanctioning body for the AMA Supercross series. Beaten by the FIM trump card, the AMA had to return to sanctioning the Clear Channel Supercross series and give up its Jam Sports plans. Clear Channel had outsmarted the AMA.

However, Jam Sports didn’t take it lying down. Jam Sports accused Clear Channel of illegally using its entertainment industry might to scuttle Jam Sport’s bid to promote Supercross racing by intimidating stadium owners (and Jam Sports had Clear Channel memos to prove their case). In January of 2005, a jury awarded Jam Sports a $90 million judgment against Clear Channel for anti-competitive behavior. And that’s the short version of how the FIM got involved in American Supercross.

• “ON ANY SUNDAY” RETURNS TO THEATERS IN OCTOBER FOR ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY

The acclaimed 1971 Oscar nominated documentary motorcycle film “On Any Sunday” will return to theaters nationwide this fall with an enhanced picture and audio release from Bruce Brown Films to kick-off and to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the iconic motion picture. The process to repair, to re-color, and to remix the groundbreaking documentary by director Bruce Brown, maker of The Endless Summer (1964) began in early 2020. The re-mastered and enhanced film was originally only going to have a streaming and DVD/blu-ray release this year, but Bruce Brown Films felt a theatrical release is what the film’s director Bruce Brown (who passed away in 2017) would have wanted.

Part of the program for local screenings nationwide will be the availability of actual stars from “On Any Sunday” and other racing legends attending screenings for autographs, Q&A sessions, and more. Legendary riders, Mert Lawwill, Dave Aldana, Keith Mashburn, Jeff Ward, Ricky Johnson, Brad Lackey, David Bailey and many others have committed to being part of this unique program. Bruce Brown’s son and filmmaker, Dana Brown (Dust To Glory, Step into Liquid, On Any Sunday-The Next Chapter), will also be available for Q&A sessions. People can follow the project’s progress at onanysunday50th.com.

FLASHBACK TO OUR 1979 YAMAHA YZ125—THEN & NOW 

The MXA wrecking crew has a lot of irons in the fire, but this particular 1979 Yamaha YZ125 project has been in the works for 41 years. It was forgotten in a barn until it was dragged out late last year and given a lavish restoration—from its Thorks all the way to its Fox Mono Air Shock.


The Thork forks may look heavy, but they are basically two hollow steel tubes and two S&W shocks. They weigh three pounds less than a conventional 1979 forks, which are full of oil and springs. This is what it looks like today after a total make-over, but look below to see what it looked like in 1979.

This is Jody at Saddleback Park on the box stock 1979 YZ125. This is the exact same bike as shown above. It was bought by an editor after the test and ended up as a trail bike until the editor moved back East. He left it behind and told Jody to do whatever he wanted with it. Jody stored it in his barn for 41 years and never rode it again.


It’s moment of glory, up until it got restored, was to make the cover of the January 1979 issue of MXA

When it was new, MXA used the YZ125 as a test bike, shootout bike (it didn’t win) and test bed for aftermarket products, which not coincidentally included Rich Thorwaldson-designed Thork forks and a Bob Fox-designed Fox Mono Air Shock.

2021 MXA 250 FOUR-STROKE SHOOTOUT VIDEO: THE REAL DEAL OF ALL SEVEN BIKES

WANNA RACE IN SOCAL? NEED TO RENT A BIKE? FIND A PLACE TO STAY? JUST CALL STAPO WHEN YOU CAN TRAVEL AGAIN

Dennis Stapleton at work.

In his spare time, when he’s not testing with MXA, racing in a foreign country, going to Japan or helping many of his motocross buddies, MXA test rider Dennis Stapleton opens up his house, garage, bikes and mechanics to help riders who would like to come to SoCal on a motocross vacation—and now that the coronavirus pandemic is waning in the USA and the country is opening back up, foreign riders will be able to come to America to race, train and sightee again. You should plan ahead and make your reservations now for this upcoming Summer and Fall. Dennis offers full service to all of the Southern California tracks for racers or play riders. Whether you want to rent a bike, move in for a week, race at Glen Helen or take motocross lessons—this is one-stop shopping. Just send them an email (Stapoknobbyshop@gmail.com). If you’d like to live the SoCal lifestyle for a day, a weekend, a week, a month or three months, visit Dennis Stapleton’s’ website at www.knobbyshopsouth.org for more details!

• WHO’S WHO IN THE 2021 FIM WORLD MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP AFTER 3 OF 18 ROUNDS

Tony Cairoli (222) notched his 93rd Grand Prix victory at the second round in England, which makes him 7 wins behind the all-time record set by Stefan Everts.

2021 FIM 450 GRAND PRIX POINT STANDINGS
(after 3 of 18 races)
1. Tim Gajser (Hon)…124
2. Jeffery Herlings (KTM)…118
3. Romain Febvre (Kaw)…107
4. Tony Cairoli (KTM)…105
5. Jorge Prado (KTM)…97
6. Jeremy Seewer (Yam)…86
7. Glenn Coldenhoff (Yam)…82
8. Pauls Jonass (Gas)…82
9. Alessandro Lupino (KTM)…69
10. Jeremy Van Horebeek (Apr)…60

2020 FIM 250 World Champion Tom Vialle (20) hurt his hand, and although he tried to ride in both England and Italy, he had to sit on the sidelines and watch his points lead go to  to Mattia Guadagnini.

2021 FIM 250 GRAND PRIX POINT STANDINGS
(after 3 of 18 races)
1. Mattia Guadagnini (KTM)…113
2. Maxime Renaux (Yam)…111
3. Ruben Fernandez (Hon)…108
4. Mathys Boisrame (Kaw)…105
5. Roan Van De Moosdijk (Kaw)…99
6. Thibault Benistant (Yam)…80
7. Rene Hofer (KTM)…79
8. Simon Laengenfelder (Gas)…70
9. Jago Geerts (Yam)…67
10. Jed Beaton (Hus)…67

2021 FIM WORLD MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP WINNERS AT A GLANCE

After the first three GPs of the the year, there have been three different 450 winners (Gajser, Cairoli and Herlings)

Date            Venue                                                                       450                                    250
Jun. 13…Orlyonok, Russia……………………………………Tim Gajser………………..Tom Vialle
Jun. 27….Matterley Basin, England…………………….Tony Cairoli……………..Mattia Guadagnini
Jul. 4…….Maggiora, Italy………………………………………Jeffrey Herlings………Mattia Guadagnini
Jul. 18….Oss, Holland
Jul. 25…Locket, Czech Republic
Aug. 1…Lommel, Belgium
Aug. 8…Kegums, Latvia
Aug. 22…KimiRing, Finland
Sep. 5…Afyonkarahisar, Turkey
Sep. 19…Rio Sardo, Sardinia
Oct. 3…Teutschenthal, Germany
Oct. 10…Lacapelle, France
Oct. 17…Intu Xanadu, Spain
Oct. 24…Agueda, Portugal
Oct. 31…Trentino, Italy
Nov. 14…TBA, Argentina
Nov. 28…Borobudur, Java
Dec. 5… Bali, Indonesia
450 points leader…Dylan Ferrandis
250 points leader…Mattia Guadagnini

MXGP’S NEXT STOP IS OSS, HOLLAND ON JULY 18

According to the MXGP promoters, the Swedish Grand Prix, originally scheduled for August 15, 2021, has been canceled and the Grand Prix of Latvia, originally scheduled for July 11 has been delayed because of government Covid restrictions and will now be held on August 8, 2021. In a final change, for this week, the previously announced Grand Prix of France, which did not have a track when the scheduled was released, will now be held at the Lacapelle-Marival on October 10. Lacapelle has never held a MXGP event, but was the site of two MX3 (650) World Championship rounds in 2009 and 2011.

• NITRO RALLYCROSS WILL BE AT GLEN HELEN ON NOVEMBER 20-21

Travis Pastrana’s Nitro Rallycross (NRC) is set to expand in a big way, announcing a full championship series comprising five races in 2021. In 2022, NRX will go even bigger with a 10-stop global championship with races in North America, Europe and the Middle East. The new championship will also feature a revolutionary electric vehicle supercar class, which will be introduced in 2022. Travis Pastrana said, “Since day one, I have truly believed that Nitro Rallycross has the potential to be the most exciting motorsports series on the planet. When we built the first NRX course in Utah we knew we had something special — from the drivers’ genuine smiles to the astonished fans as cars flew side-by-side over 100-foot jumps. Now, as we get ready for the next chapter of NRX, I’m more convinced than ever that this will bring top drivers from all disciplines to challenge themselves as their teams push the envelope in vehicle development. It’s going to be a hell of a ride and this is only the beginning.”

• 2021 MXA 450 SHOOTOUT: THE LONGEST AND MOST DETAILED SHOOTOUT EVER

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KEEPING TRACK OF THE 2021 RACE SCHEDULES

The Mt. Morris fans, in their enthusiasm for Jett Lawrence, made up posters and dressed up as donuts to win a signed Jett Lawrence jersey.

2021 AMA NATIONAL MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP (REVISED)
May 29…Pala, CA
Jun 5…Thunder Valley, CO
June 19…Mt. Morris, PA
July 3…Red Bud, MI
July 10…Southwick, MA
July 17….Millville, MN
July 24….Washougal, WA
Aug. 14…Unadilla, NY
Aug. 21…Budds Creek, MD
Aug. 28…Crawfordsville, IN
Sept. 4…Pala, CA
Sept.11…Hangtown, CA

2021 FIM GRAND PRIX CHAMPIONSHIP (REVISED)
Jun. 13…Orlyonok, Russia
Jun. 27…Matterley Basin, England
Jul. 4…Maggiora, Italy
Jul. 11…Kegums, Latvia (Moved to Aug. 8)
Jul. 18…Oss, Holland
Jul. 25…Locket, Czech Republic
Aug. 1…Lommel, Belgium
Aug. 8…Kegums, Latvia (New date)
Aug 15…Uddevall, Sweden (Canceled)
Aug. 22…KimiRing, Finland
Sep. 5…Afyonkarahisar, Turkey
Sep. 19…Rio Sardo, Sardinia
Oct. 3…Teutschenthal, Germany
Oct. 10…Lacapelle, France
Oct. 17…Intu Xanadu, Spain
Oct. 24…Agueda, Portugal
Oct. 31…Trentino, Italy
Nov. 14…TBA, Argentina
Nov. 28…Borobudur, Java
Dec. 5… Bali, Indonesia

2021 WORLD SIDECAR MOTOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Aug. 1…Strassbessenbach, Ger
Aug. 22…Jinin, CzR
Aug. 29…Roggenburg, Swi
Sep. 19…Oss, Hol
Sept. 26…Rudersberg, Ger
Oct. 10…Kramolin, CzR

2021 REM RACE SCHEDULE
July 17…Glen Helen, CA
July 24…Glen Helen, CA
Aug. 7……Glen Helen, National track
Aug. 14…Glen Helen, CA
Aug. 21…Glen Helen, CA
Sept. 11…Glen Helen, CA
Sept. 18…Glen Helen, CA
Oct. 30…Glen Helen (Octobercross)
Nov. 20…Glen Helen, CA
Dec. 4…Glen Helen, CA
Dec. 18…Glen Helen, CA

REVISED 2021 SCOTTISH NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
May 15/16…Tains
Jun. 26/27..Lochgilphead
Jul. 10… Doune (Youth)
Jul. 17…Doune (Adult )
Aug. 14/15…Rhynie
Sept. 4/5…Desertmartin, Northern Ireland
Oct. 9/10…Tain

2021 AUSTRALIAN NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP
Apr. 11…Wonthaggi, VIC
May 2 …Canberra, ACT
Jun. 27…Maitland, NSW
Jul. 25…Wodonga, VIC (Postoned
Aug. 8…Coulson, QLD
Aug. 14….Coolum, QLD
Aug. 15….Coolum, QLD
Sept. 5…Gillman, SA

2021 ADAC GERMAN NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP (REVISED)
Jul. 4…Bielstein
Jul. 18…Tensfeld
Aug. 8…Dreetz
Sep. 5…Furstilich Drehna
Sep. 12…Gaildorf

2021 MOTOCROSS DES NATIONS
Sep. 26…Mantova, Italy

2021 REM OCTOBERCROSS
Oct. 30…Glen Helen

2021 DUBYA WORLD VET CHAMPIONSHIP
Nov. 5-7…Glen Helen

2021 PARIS SUPERCROSS
Nov. 6-7…Paris, France

FINAL 2021 AMA SUPERCROSS CHAMPIONSHIP (UPDATED)
Jan. 16 (Saturday)…Houston, TX
Jan. 19 (Tuesday)….Houston, TX
Jan. 23 (Saturday)…Houston, TX
Jan. 30 (Saturday)…Indianapolis, IN
Feb. 2 (Tuesday)….Indianapolis, IN
Feb. 6 (Saturday)…Indianapolis, IN
Feb. 13 (Saturday)…Orlando, FL
Feb. 20 (Saturday)…Orlando, FL
Mar. 6 (Saturday)…Daytona Beach, FL
Mar. 13 (Saturday)…Arlington, TX
Mar. 16 (Tuesday)… Arlington, TX
Mar. 20 (Saturday)…Arlington, TX
Apr.10 (Saturday)…Atlanta, GA
Apr.13 (Tuesday)…Atlanta, GA
Apr.17 (Saturday)…Atlanta, GA
Apr. 24 (Saturday)…Salt Lake City, UT
May 1 (Saturday)…Salt Lake City, UT

FINAL 2021 AMA KICKER ARENACROSS CHAMPIONSHIP
Jan. 8…….Starkville, MS
Jan. 9…….Starkville, MS
Jan. 15…….Lubbock, TX
Jan. 16…….Lubbock, TV
Jan. 22…….Guthrie, OK
Jan. 23…….Guthrie, OK
Jan. 29…….Denver, CO
Jan. 30…….Denver, CO
Feb. 5…….Tampa, Fl
Feb. 6…….Tampa, Fl
Mar. 5…….Amarillo, TX
Mar. 6…….Amarillo, TX

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MXA YOUTUBE CHANNEL | HIT THAT SUBSCRIBE BUTTON

The MXA wrecking crew is everything moto related. Check out our MXA YouTube channel for bike reviews, Supercross coverage, rider interviews and much more. And don’t forgot to hit that subscribe button.

Photos Credits: Kawasaki, KTM, MXGP Trevor Nelson, Jon Ortner, Brian Converse,  Daryl Ecklund, Yamaha, MXA

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